Understanding Employee Motivation and Applying Theory to the Workplace

Below is the introduction to an article that I co-authored and was recently published in the SACRAO (Southern Association of College Registrars and Admissions Officers) journal. Understanding our team members and their motivations not just for working hard, but also for working well, are key to maximizing productivity and having a well-run office.  This is regardless of whether you have 1 team member or much larger numbers to manage.  You can view the full article at https://www.drconnieshipman.com.

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Being chosen for a leadership position is only the beginning of becoming a leader. To
become more than “the boss” people follow because they are required to do so — or to
become someone employees will want to follow at all — leaders must master the ability
to invest in people and inspire those around them. Simultaneously, in order to succeed
in a leadership role, one must build a team that consistently produces measurable
results. There are multiple paths to explore along the journey to reaching the “pinnacle”
of leadership (Maxwell, 1999), where your influence extends beyond the people who
are in your immediate sphere. During the journey, you are not only learning how to lead
people and encourage their professional development, you should also be engaging
in self-reflection on your leadership and communication styles. Time may feel like a
limited resource, but being more purposeful about understanding employee motivation
and “crucial conversations” (Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, & Switzler, 2012) will help you
lead an efficient and motivated team and ultimately make everyone more satisfied with
their work.

This article is based on a presentation by the authors at the American Association
of College Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) conference in April 2017.
During the presentation, we explored levels and sources of leadership, promoters and
deterrents to motivation, and the importance of proper communication as it pertains to
development of people and teams. Points were infused with examples of challenges
and triumphs throughout our careers to date, as well as best practices used to motivate
individuals across small and large teams. For purposes of this paper, we have created
two scenarios we believe will be relatable, reviewed the information presented in
the AACRAO session, and discussed how that information can be applied in these
situations.

#leadership    #motivation     #teams     #employees

Sharpen Your Saw: An Observation

On Sunday, I listened to a diverse group of young graduate students, soon to be professionals, share goals and objectives relative to the student organizations in which they hold leadership positions. As I observed, the principle that resonated with me was Sharpen Your Saw. I’ve long admired Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw, is one that often hangs in my memory. Admittedly, I usually only think in terms of attempts to stay mentally sharp but in reality, and in short, this habit speaks to the need to continually utilize resources and tools that will strengthen your overall ability to be productive and be a part of the change that you desire to see. Sharpening the Saw is about renewal.

During this leadership retreat, which was set in a peaceful camp and retreat center area, these student leaders were able to address the four areas wherein sharpening is necessary for renewal: physical, social/emotional, spiritual, and mental. To participate in the retreat, they had to be willing to step away from the rigors of law school studies and refocus their energies towards planning, brainstorming, strategizing, networking, and synergizing. As a bonus, they also had a chance to enjoy nature and engage in physical activities. I do believe that both the individual and student organizations represented will be the better for it.

In closing, I have to give props where they are due, for I was truly an observer only in these efforts; I did absolutely nothing to make it happen. With that said, kudos to the dean of Campbell Law School, J. Rich Leonard, for making the retreat possible and his staff who took part to ensure its success. One more example of successful collaboration!  Until next time, take a moment to sharpen your saw.

#studentleaders  #CampbellLaw  #StephenCovey

Racism and Higher Education

Hello Everyone,

The below is the most recent Executive Director’s update from *AACRAO, as posted on August 16, 2017.  I am sharing it because I feel it is well said and on point.  Enjoy the read and recall the quote from Dr. Maya Angelou:  

“Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future, and renders the present inaccessible.”

*AACRAO – American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers

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“The disturbing events in Charlottesville this past weekend have had a profound impact on many of us as we watched white supremist, anti-Semitic, and other racist groups march openly on the campus of the University of Virginia. While our awareness of these groups may have previously been limited, assuming they were largely confined to the dark corners of the internet, we now have no choice but to acknowledge that these groups are thriving and represent a significant threat to our core values.

One of the more troubling dimensions of the events in Charlottesville was that the participants appeared to be largely young, white men of traditional college age. A number were, in fact, identified as students at our universities. Any notion that those holding racists views in our country were confined to an aging population that would soon be replaced by a more tolerant and accepting younger generation were dashed by the blatant expression of hatred displayed by these young people.

It is clear that these groups espousing racist, white supremist, and anti-Semitic views see our campuses as fertile ground for their messages of intolerance. While the vast majority of us watched the events in Charlottesville with dismay, the organizers of the event and other hate groups seem to have been emboldened by the experience and have announced their intentions to hold marches and rallies at our colleges and universities in the coming months.

This cannot go unchallenged. We cannot be silent in the face of racist, xenophobic, sexist, anti-Semitic and homophobic acts/statements. Our silence is not only complicit, it’s an endorsement. These groups confuse our commitment to free expression for acceptance of their beliefs. They see our lack of explicit condemnation as affirmation that their views deserve equal consideration. And when we do speak out against their appearances on our campuses they often turn the tables and accuse us of hypocrisy and intolerance.

Our campuses have historically served as powerful voices in confronting societal injustices. From the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee organizing Freedom Rides that highlighted racial injustice in the 1960s to students and staff in the 1980s compelling their institutions to withdraw their investments in companies that provided the financial underpinnings for the Apartheid regime in South Africa, colleges and universities have stood on the right “side” of social justice. To allow groups to use our campuses to foment hate stands in the face of everything we have achieved.

What can we do to confront these groups? First, speak out. Engage with members of your campus who are working to create welcoming and inclusive communities. Listen to the concerns of students and “actively promote the expansion of ideas, perspectives, and understanding that comes from a diverse and inclusive community” as described in our AACRAO Core Competency on Diversity and Inclusion.”

As Maya Angelou eloquently stated, “Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future, and renders the present inaccessible.”

Jim Bouse, President

Paul Kyle, Past President

Tina Faulkner, President Elect

Tiffany Robinson, Vice President for Access and Equity

Mike Reilly, Executive Director

The 90/10 Rule for Successful Organizations and Leadership

Noted this from a communication from the Raleigh,  NC Chamber of Commerce

The 90/10 Rule for successful organizations and I would dare say, leadership, is based on simple math — 90 percent of your attention should be on people development, with the remaining 10 percent devoted to the task.

Whether a for-profit, not-for-profit, corporation, school, church, or otherwise, let us NEVER forget that people matter.  Moreover, let us never forget to make sure they know that.  #peoplematter  #leadership  #success  #organizations

Do Students Vote with Their Feet?

To all my current or “to be” professors, administrators in higher education, or opinionated folks (regardless of the field), what think ye of the phrase, “students vote with their feet” and how realistic do you think it is?  Should colleges consider this a growing trend or threat and if so, what are some PRACTICAL steps an institution can take to ensure voting feet stay grounded?