A Thought on Personal Commitment

He who has done his best for his own time has lived for all times.” -Johann von Shiller, Playwright. Another quote I’ve borrowed from Dr. John Maxwell’s book, The 21 Indispensable Qualities of A Leader.

When I read it, I thought to myself, “That can be a definition of success…to have done your best for your own time, the time in which you lived and had an opportunity to impact people.” You know where this mindset stems from?…Commitment! Yep, commitment is key, for it can manifest in various ways, from the productive work hours we maintain, to self-improvement goals, to sacrifices we make for team members, family, and etc. Commitment isn’t entirely selfless, for in the long run, we find that as we commit to do the best that we can with the time, energy, and resources we have, we ourselves are greatly impacted and blessed. Our reach goes beyond our time.

Have you ever transitioned positions or jobs and later heard from prior team members that you are missed because_______ or they learned ______ from you and are using that to make a difference? Often, these little but consistent examples of commitment seem miniscule, but like children, little acts can have a huge impact. Therefore, I encourage you to continue with commitment, for though at times it seems to be moot, insignificant, or mundane, it has the opportunity to make a difference somehow, somewhere, to someone. Michelangelo never knew that his reluctant agreement to commit to paint a depiction on the Sistine Chapel would evolve into a masterpiece and proceed to bless millions of people over the centuries. You don’t know how your commitment will proceed to bless countless others and I encourage you not to dwell on that. Instead, dwell on doing the best you can with the time, energy, and resources at your disposal, and have that which you do be genuine, your actions be consistent, and your heart be at peace. Tootles!

#Commitment #Influence

God Will Wait on You 

From Pastor Rick Warren’s Daily Devotional 
Jesus waited until the disciples got concerned before He did anything in the situation. 

Maybe you’re having a problem in your marriage or your finances. God sees the problem and He recognizes it. But He waits on you to get concerned and accept responsibility for it before He does anything about it.  

 Like the disciples, there are three common reactions that people have toward problems:

We procrastinate — “By this time it was late in the day.” (verse 35) The disciples put off the problem until the end of the day. They did nothing and Jesus waited on them.  

We pass the buck — “Send the people away.” (verse 36) Basically the disciples were saying, “It’s not our problem. If they’re hungry, let them go find their own food.” 

We worry about it — “Lord, if we did that it’d cost eight months of a man’s wages. Are we going to go spend that much on bread and give it to them to eat?” (verse 38) The disciples’ anxiety went into overdrive and they started worrying. 

Worrying is the opposite of faith. It never solves anything. It only makes problems worse. 

I know this to be true but still, I was a worrier…definitely fell into that category.  Thank God for continual growth and the opportunity to change.  Sometimes challenges are allowed so we can grow and it’s only after the fact that we find an appreciation for what we’ve gone through.  Just as in the situation with the two loaves and five fishes to feed a whole bunch of folk, God ensures the need is met once we expose the need to Him.  The resolution is not always in our preferred timing but it is timely.  Go God!
Relevant scripture:

“And when the day was now far spent, his disciples came unto him, and said, The place is desert, and the day is now far spent; send them away, that they may go into the country and villages round about, and buy themselves somewhat to eat.  But he answered and said unto them, Give ye them to eat. And they say unto him, Shall we go and buy two hundred shillings’ worth of bread, and give them to eat? And he saith unto them, How many loaves have ye? go and see. And when they knew, they say, Five, and two fishes. And he commanded them that all should sit down by companies upon the green grass. And they sat down in ranks, by hundreds, and by fifties. And he took the five loaves and the two fishes, and looking up to heaven, he blessed, and brake the loaves; and he gave to the disciples to set before them; and the two fishes divided he among them all. And they all ate, and were filled. And they took up broken pieces, twelve basketfuls, and also of the fishes. And they that ate the loaves were five thousand men.”

Mark 6:35-36 ASV

Mark 6:37-44 ASV